Biochemistry & Cell Biology (BCB) Faculty

Yashi Ahmed, M.D., Ph.D.

 

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 613 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1027


We study the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and Axin tumor suppressors and Beta-catenin oncogene, misregulation of which triggers development of colorectal carcinoma. We study the regulation of Beta-catenin by APC and Axin in Drosophila because the functions of these proteins are well conserved from flies to humans and powerful genetics approaches are available.

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Charles K. Barlowe, Ph.D.

James C. Chilcott 1920 Professor and Chair of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 414 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-6516


My research group investigates intracellular trafficking and we seek to understand the molecular mechanisms that control protein transport through the early secretory pathway. We use a multidisciplinary approach that includes biochemistry, molecular genetics, proteomics and microscopy in model systems.

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Magdalena Bezanilla, Ph.D.

Ernest Everett Just 1907 Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: LSC 334

Phone: 603-646-2314


My research aims to understand how molecules within cells impart geometric information ultimately leading to cell shape determination. Research in my lab seeks to identify molecules within the cell that control cellular patterning. We are particularly interested in the role of regulators of the cytoskeleton and membrane trafficking and have pioneered the use of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Using the unusually rapid transgenic capabilities of moss, we are pursuing novel approaches to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying plant cell shape.

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Sharon E. Bickel, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 238 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-0245


Chromosome segregation errors in human oocytes are the leading cause of miscarriages and birth defects and their frequency increases dramatically as women age. Work in my laboratory is focused on defining the pathway of events necessary for chromosomes to ""do the right thing"" during meiosis and understanding the molecular events that cause reduced fidelity of meiotic chromosome segregation as oocytes age.

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James B. Bliska, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 602W Borwell

Phone: 
650-1168

My long-term research focus is to understand how bacterial toxins interact with the immune system to trigger pathogenesis or host protection. At Dartmouth, I will expand my research to investigate opportunistic bacterial pathogens that produce toxins and cause mucosal infections, such as those that occur in the lungs of Cystic Fibrosis patients. I will also be using synthetic immunology to develop novel therapeutics to combat opportunistic mucosal pathogens.

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TY Chang, Ph.D.

  • Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology
  • Office: 304 Vail
  • Phone: 603-650-1622

  • The enzyme acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) is a membrane bound protein located at the endoplasmic reticulum. It plays important roles in health and in diseases. Our laboratory identified the ACAT1 gene. We are conducting structure-function analysis of ACAT1 in vitro, and taking mouse genetic approaches to determine the pathophysiological role of ACAT1 in Alzheimer's disease, in atherosclerosis, and in diet-induced obesity.

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Michael D. Cole, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

633 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-9975 


Our studies that focus on the genetic events involved in the induction of cancer provide an opportunity to define the molecular basis of the disease and to study the regulation and function of important eukaryotic genes that control cell proliferation.

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Duane A. Compton, Ph.D.

Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Dean of Geisel School of Medicine

Office: 413 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1190


We investigate the mechanisms that regulate accurate chromosome segregation in human cells and the causes of chromosomal instability in tumors.


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Patrick J. Dolph, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 351 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-1092


Our laboratory utilizes Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study retinal degeneration and molecular mechanisms of cell death.


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Jay C. Dunlap, Ph.D.

Nathan Smith Professor of Genetics, Chair and Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 702 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1108


Work in the Dunlap lab is directed towards understanding circadian biology, the means by which biological clocks operate, are reset by the environment, and control the metabolism of cells. More recently a second effort has nucleated around high throughput functional genomics of filamentous fungi including Neurospora and Aspergillus spp.

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Scott A. Gerber, Ph.D.

  • Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology
  • Office: 734 Rubin
  • Phone: 603-653-3679 

  • Research in the Gerber Lab is focused on developing and using modernproteomics methods to understand the mechanisms by which dysregulated mitotic kinases, such as Aurora kinase A, contribute to the onset and maintenance of cancers.

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Erik E. Griffin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 348 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-8269


We are interested in understanding how protein concentration gradients are generated in the cytoplasm and contribute to cell fate specification during development. We combine live imaging, biochemical and genetic approaches to study a series of cytoplasmic protein gradients that help pattern the early C. elegans embryo. 


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Bing He, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 350 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-2649 


I am interested in how complex tissue and organ structures arise from simple tissue primordia. Using an interdisciplinary approach combining genetics, cell biology, biophysics and mathematical modeling, we seek to understand how developmental patterning information controls individual cell shape changes and how they are integrated into stereotyped tissue-scale deformations.


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Henry N. Higgs, Ph.D.

Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 403 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1520


Mammalian cells use actin filaments in a huge number of ways, and we are trying to figure out how cells control when and where specific actin-based structures are made. We use a combination of cellular (live-cell microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, EM, cell-free assays) and biochemical (actin polymerization kinetics, analytical ultracentrifugation, structural analysis) in our research.


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Jane Hill, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Engineering and Microbiology and Immunology

Office: MacLean 305 


Phone: 646-8656

Our research focuses on rapid, non-invasive detection and the tracking of infectious respiratory diseases using patient breath. Diseases we focus on range from acute pneumonias, such as those caused by influenza or bacterial agents like Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus, to chronic respiratory infections, such as those caused by Mycobacteria tuberculosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-dominant polymicrobial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We combine molecular biological, analytical chemistry, and 'big data' biostatistics tools when asking our metabolism-focused questions in the flask, animal model, or human patient. As such, our team consists of combinations of molecular biologists, microbiologist, chemists, engineers, medical doctors, and chemometricians.

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Robert A. Hill Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 344 Life Sciences Center

Phone:

We study the multicellular interactions between neurons and glia in the brain with a primary focus on the development,plasticity, and regeneration of myelinating oligodendrocytes. Techniques include high-resolution optical imaging in combination with molecular labels, genetic manipulation, and sensors of cellular physiology.


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Michael B. Hoppa, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 345 Life Sciences

Phone: 603-646-8850


We explore the molecular mechanisms that control ion channel localization, expression and function in primary neurons using quantitative optical approaches in combination with genetic and biochemical tools. 


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Yina H. Huang, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, and Pathology and Lab Medicine

Office: 604E Borwell

Phone: 603-650-7545 


We investigate how T cells traffic and respond to infections and tumors. In particular, we study the signals that regulate differentiation and migration of effector and memory T cell and are exploring methods to manipulate their activity to ensure protective and durable immune protection. 


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Arminja N. Kettenbach, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 763 Rubin 
Phone: 603-653-9067 


Research in the lab focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which phosphatases contribute to phosphorylation-dependent signal transduction in mitosis. We use cell biological, biochemical, and proteomics approaches to decipher the connectivity and complexity of these signaling events in normal and cancer cells. 


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Steven D. Leach, M.D.

Director of Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Preston T. and Virginia R. Kelsey Distinguished Chair in Cancer

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: DH, Rubin Building, Room 801

Phone: 603-653-3611 


The Leach lab studies pancreatic developmental, epithelial and tumor biology, using mouse, zebrafish and human model sytems. 


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Wei-Lih Lee, Ph.D.

Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: Class of 1978 Life Sciences Center, Room 224

Phone: 603-650-1154


I am interested in understanding how eukaryotic cells organize, position, and segregate their organelles during asymmetric cell divisions. We combine classical genetics and live-cell microscopy with biochemical and biophysical techniques to elucidate the molecular pathways that regulate the microtubule cytoskeleton and the motor proteins responsible for organellar interaction and positioning in our model system budding yeast.

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Jennifer J. Loros, Ph.D.

Professor of Biochemistry, and Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 704 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1154


Our laboratories are interested in the genetic and molecular dissection of circadian systems in eukaryotic cells with a research emphasis on the fungus Neurospora and mammalian tissue culture. The circadian system comprises the core molecular feedback loop, how this loop feeds information to the cell and organism and how input to the loop via temperature changes and photoreceptors is regulated.


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Dean R. Madden, Ph.D.

Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Dartmouth Vice Provost for Research

Office: 408A Vail

Phone: 603-650-1164


Structure and function of ion channels and proteins that regulate their intracellular trafficking.


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James B. Moseley, Ph.D.


Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 412 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1159

Many cell types delay cell cycle transitions until they reach a critical size threshold. We are studying the cellular mechanisms that measure size, and their role in coordinating cell growth and division.

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Larry C. Myers, Ph.D.


Associate Professor of Medical Education, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: Vail 412

Phone: 603-650-1198

The goal of our lab is to determine how genetic and epigenetic information in eukaryotic cells is used to regulate the transcription of genes. We are particularly interested in how human fungal pathogens utilize epigenetic regulatory strategies to switch phenotypes and facilitate virulence.

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Diwakar Pattabiraman Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, and Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Office: Rubin 602

Phone: 603-653-9957 


Our research focuses on understanding the genetic, epigenetic, signaling and cell biological aspects of tumor progression and metastasis in carcinomas. We study the role of transitions in epithelial and mesenchymal states within carcinomas as a model of understanding intratumoral heterogeneity to develop novel ways of overcoming metastatic progression and therapy resistance.


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Yolanda Sanchez, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Associate Director for Basic Sciences, Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Office:  Vail 501

Phone:  603-650-1669

Checkpoint signaling events triggered during the response to DNA damage or replication interference, how they regulate cell cycle progression, DNA repair and cell death.  The role of checkpoints in the etiology of cancer and as drug targets for therapeutic enhancers of genotoxic cancer drugs.

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G. Eric Schaller, Ph.D.

Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 339 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-2525


Signal transduction by the plant hormones ethylene and cytokinin, and how these hormones act to control growth and development.


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Daniel Schultz, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 206 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1644


The Schultz lab develops quantitative approaches to study the emergence, operation and optimization of the gene networks that control cell responses in bacteria, with a focus on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. We combine mathematical modeling, bioinformatics, experimental evolution and microfluidics to analyze how the cell controls the expression of resistance genes during drug responses. We strive to guide innovation in clinical therapies by uncovering the selective pressures that shape the evolution of antibiotic resistance in natural environments.

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Christopher J. Shoemaker, Ph.D.

  • Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology
  • Office: 302B Vail
  • Phone: 603-650-1112
  • We are interested in the molecular mechanisms governing mammalian autophagy. We take a multidisciplinary approach involving CRISPR-based genetic screening, flow cytometry, quantitative microscopy and biochemical analysis.

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Roger D. Sloboda, Ph.D.

Ira Allen Eastman Professor Biological Sciences

Office: 222 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-2377


We study microtubule dependent particle motility inside cells using intraflagellar transport (IFT) in the biflagellate green alga, Chlamydomonas and the primary cilia of MDCK cells in culture as the model systems.


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Elizabeth F. Smith, Ph.D.

Paul M. Danten Jr Professor

Professor of Biological Sciences

Dean of Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Office: 226 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-1129


The proper assembly and regulated function of eukaryotic cilia is critical for development and sustained human health. We use a variety of biochemical, molecular, and genetic techniques to elucidate the signal transduction pathways that regulate motor proteins responsible for ciliary beating.


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Bruce Stanton, Ph.D.

Andrew C. Vail Memorial Professor

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, and of Physiology

Office: 615 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1775


Our laboratory studies the genetic disease Cystic Fibrosis. In particular we study host pathogen interactions between bacteria and human airway epithelial cells and the interactome of CFTR and how interacting proteins regulate CFTR trafficking. We also examine how environmental toxins, in particular arsenic, cause and contribute to respiratory and diseases and inflammation.


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William T. Wickner, M.D.


Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 425 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1701

We study how membrane vesicles fuse as they deliver new proteins, hormones, and neurotransmitters to their destinations.

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