Biophysics & Structural Biology (BSB) Faculty

James B. Bliska, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 602W Borwell

Phone: 
650-1168

My long-term research focus is to understand how bacterial toxins interact with the immune system to trigger pathogenesis or host protection. At Dartmouth, I will expand my research to investigate opportunistic bacterial pathogens that produce toxins and cause mucosal infections, such as those that occur in the lungs of Cystic Fibrosis patients. I will also be using synthetic immunology to develop novel therapeutics to combat opportunistic mucosal pathogens.

Email

 | PubMed Articles

 | Geisel Profile

Zi Chen, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Engineering, and Biological Sciences

Office: MacLean 302

Phone: 603-646-6475


Dr. Chen's research interests range from biomechanics and mechanobiology to solid mechanics and material science, covering such diverse topics as mechanics of morphogenesis in biological systems, cell biomechanics, fast motion of plants, mechanics of DNA structures, mechanical instabilities of materials, energy harvesting, stretchable electronics, biomimetic materials/devices, nanofabrication, and modeling of 2D materials.

Website | Email | PubMed Articles

 | Faculty Profile

Gevorg Grigoryan, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Computer Science, and Biological Sciences

Office: Sudikoff 113

Phone: 603-646-3173


We are interested in understanding the design principles underlying natural protein function on a quantitative, structure-based level. We employ a mix of computational and experimental approaches to both understand functions of natural proteins and engineer proteins with novel functionality. 


Website | Email | PubMed Articles

 | Faculty Profile

Allan Gulledge, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 601 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1222

Our research focus is the cerebral cortex, an area of the brain that serves as the biological substrate for the higher cognitive functions that define us as individuals. We wish to identify the mechanisms by which individual cortical neurons process and transmit information within the cortical circuit. To accomplish this we employ electrical and optical recording techniques that measure neuronal activity in neocortical neurons under a variety of experimental conditions.


Website | Email | PubMed Articles

 | Geisel Profile

Bing He, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 350 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-2649 


I am interested in how complex tissue and organ structures arise from simple tissue primordia. Using an interdisciplinary approach combining genetics, cell biology, biophysics and mathematical modeling, we seek to understand how developmental patterning information controls individual cell shape changes and how they are integrated into stereotyped tissue-scale deformations.


Website | Email 

| Faculty Profile

Michael B. Hoppa, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 345 Life Sciences

Phone: 603-646-8850


We explore the molecular mechanisms that control ion channel localization, expression and function in primary neurons using quantitative optical approaches in combination with genetic and biochemical tools. 


Website | Email | PubMed Articles | Faculty Profile

F. Jon Kull, Ph.D.

Rodgers Professor of Chemistry, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Dean, Guarini School of Graduate and Advanced Sciences

Office: 304 Burke

Phone: 603-646-1552 


Our laboratory uses biophysical techniques to study protein structure and function. Our goal is to understand at a fundamental level the conformational changes that occur in proteins as they complete the various cellular functions. 


Email | Faculty Profile

Wei-Lih Lee, Ph.D.

Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: Class of 1978 Life Sciences Center, Room 224

Phone: 603-650-1154


I am interested in understanding how eukaryotic cells organize, position, and segregate their organelles during asymmetric cell divisions. We combine classical genetics and live-cell microscopy with biochemical and biophysical techniques to elucidate the molecular pathways that regulate the microtubule cytoskeleton and the motor proteins responsible for organellar interaction and positioning in our model system budding yeast.

Email | Faculty Profile

Dean R. Madden, Ph.D.

Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Dartmouth Vice Provost for Research

Office: 408A Vail

Phone: 603-650-1164


Structure and function of ion channels and proteins that regulate their intracellular trafficking.


Website | Email | PubMed Articles

 | Geisel Profile

Dale F. Mierke, Ph.D.

Professor of Chemistry, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 202 Burke

Phone: 603-646-1154


Develop molecular inhibitors of specific protein-protein interactions which may find use as physiological tools or eventual therapeutic agents, using the structural features as determined from many experimental (mainly NMR) and computational techniques.


Email | PubMed Articles

 | Faculty Profile

Ekaterina V. Pletneva, Ph.D.


Associate Professor of Chemistry, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 114 Burke

Phone: 603-546-2501

Our studies examine the interplay between protein dynamics and redox reactivity in signaling transformations and address fundamental problems in reaction mechanisms, coordination chemistry and biology.

Website | Email 

| Faculty Profile

Michael J. Ragusa, Ph.D.


Assistant Professor of Chemistry, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 221 Burke

Phone: 603-646-9066

Autophagy is a catabolic cellular process capable of degrading large cellular material including organelles and aggregates. We are interested in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of autophagy through a combination of X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering and biochemistry.

Website | Email | PubMed Articles

 | Faculty Profile

Daniel Schultz, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 206 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1644


The Schultz lab develops quantitative approaches to study the emergence, operation and optimization of the gene networks that control cell responses in bacteria, with a focus on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. We combine mathematical modeling, bioinformatics, experimental evolution and microfluidics to analyze how the cell controls the expression of resistance genes during drug responses. We strive to guide innovation in clinical therapies by uncovering the selective pressures that shape the evolution of antibiotic resistance in natural environments.

Website | Email | PubMed Articles

 | Geisel Profile

Surachai Supattapone, M.D., Ph.D., D.Phil.


Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, and Medicine

Office: 311 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1192

Our lab investigates the molecular mechanisms responsible for the propagation of protein misfolding in neurodegenerative diseases such as prion and Alzheimer's disease.

Website | Email | PubMed Articles

 | Geisel Profile