Cancer Biology (CANB) Faculty

Yashi Ahmed, M.D., Ph.D.

 

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 613 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1027


We study the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and Axin tumor suppressors and Beta-catenin oncogene, misregulation of which triggers development of colorectal carcinoma. We study the regulation of Beta-catenin by APC and Axin in Drosophila because the functions of these proteins are well conserved from flies to humans and powerful genetics approaches are available.

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Brent L. Berwin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 614W Borwell

Phone: 603-650-6899


Our research interests have the common theme of trying to understand how leukocytes modulate host immunity, both in response to bacterial infection and in response to cancer.

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Zi Chen, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Engineering, and Biological Sciences

Office: MacLean 302

Phone: 603-646-6475


Dr. Chen's research interests range from biomechanics and mechanobiology to solid mechanics and material science, covering such diverse topics as mechanics of morphogenesis in biological systems, cell biomechanics, fast motion of plants, mechanics of DNA structures, mechanical instabilities of materials, energy harvesting, stretchable electronics, biomimetic materials/devices, nanofabrication, and modeling of 2D materials.

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Michael D. Cole, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

633 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-9975 


Our studies that focus on the genetic events involved in the induction of cancer provide an opportunity to define the molecular basis of the disease and to study the regulation and function of important eukaryotic genes that control cell proliferation.

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Duane A. Compton, Ph.D.

Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Dean of Geisel School of Medicine

Office: 413 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1190


We investigate the mechanisms that regulate accurate chromosome segregation in human cells and the causes of chromosomal instability in tumors.


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Steven N. Fiering, Ph.D.

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, and Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 622 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-9966


My lab is working on novel approaches to detection and treatment of cancer. These approaches center on developing antitumor immune responses using nanoparticles and microorganisms. We are also generating novel mouse models of cancer and other diseases using genetically engineering mice.


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Scott A. Gerber, Ph.D.

  • Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology
  • Office: 734 Rubin
  • Phone: 603-653-3679 

  • Research in the Gerber Lab is focused on developing and using modernproteomics methods to understand the mechanisms by which dysregulated mitotic kinases, such as Aurora kinase A, contribute to the onset and maintenance of cancers.

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Yina H. Huang, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, and Pathology and Lab Medicine

Office: 604E Borwell

Phone: 603-650-7545 


We investigate how T cells traffic and respond to infections and tumors. In particular, we study the signals that regulate differentiation and migration of effector and memory T cell and are exploring methods to manipulate their activity to ensure protective and durable immune protection. 


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Arminja N. Kettenbach, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 763 Rubin 
Phone: 603-653-9067 


Research in the lab focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which phosphatases contribute to phosphorylation-dependent signal transduction in mitosis. We use cell biological, biochemical, and proteomics approaches to decipher the connectivity and complexity of these signaling events in normal and cancer cells. 


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Steven D. Leach, M.D.

Director of Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Preston T. and Virginia R. Kelsey Distinguished Chair in Cancer

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: DH, Rubin Building, Room 801

Phone: 603-653-3611 


The Leach lab studies pancreatic developmental, epithelial and tumor biology, using mouse, zebrafish and human model sytems. 


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David W. Mullins, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Medical Education, and Microbiology and Immunology

Office:  232 Remsen

Phone:  603-650-1208

Our lab studies the molecular mechanisms that govern T cell infiltration of metastatic cancers. We translate our basic research findings into novel therapies that induce or augment immune cell infiltration of refractory tumors, thereby enhancing the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy.


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Diwakar Pattabiraman Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, and Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Office: Rubin 602

Phone: 603-653-9957 


Our research focuses on understanding the genetic, epigenetic, signaling and cell biological aspects of tumor progression and metastasis in carcinomas. We study the role of transitions in epithelial and mesenchymal states within carcinomas as a model of understanding intratumoral heterogeneity to develop novel ways of overcoming metastatic progression and therapy resistance.


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Patricia A. Pioli, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 644E Borwell Building

Phone: 603-650-2584 


Research in our laboratory is focused on identifying the molecular mechanisms that regulate macrophage activation in the context of both autoimmunity and cancer. Taking advantage of macrophage plasticity, we then use this information to determine how macrophage activation can be altered for maximal therapeutic benefit.


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Yolanda Sanchez, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Associate Director for Basic Sciences, Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Office:  Vail 501

Phone:  603-650-1669

Checkpoint signaling events triggered during the response to DNA damage or replication interference, how they regulate cell cycle progression, DNA repair and cell death.  The role of checkpoints in the etiology of cancer and as drug targets for therapeutic enhancers of genotoxic cancer drugs.

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Rahul Sarpeshkar, Ph.D.

Thomas E Kurtz Professor of Engineering

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Molecular and Systems Biology, and Physiology

Office: 507A Vail

Phone: 603-646-6821


Synthetic analog and digital biological circuits in electri-cigenic and other microbes; Applications of synthetic and systems biology to immunology, infectious disease, and cancer; Precision measurement, electronic circuit modeling, and feedback control of living cells at the fundamental limits set by physics.

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Mary Jo Turk, Ph.D.


Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 732 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-3549

Our research focuses on understanding how the immune system responds to cancer, with an emphasis on T cell memory. We are also interested in learning how autoimmunity influences anti-tumor immunity.

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Edward J. Usherwood, Ph.D.

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 608E Borwell

Phone: 603-650-7730


Immunity to virus infections, T cell memory, the immune-virus interface in persistent virus infection.


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Xiaofeng Wang, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 632 Rubin

Phone:  603-653-9974


Our work focuses on cancer epigenetics. We are particularly interested in studying a family of chromatin remodeling complexes, which are frequently mutated in a variety of human cancers. Our work is aimed to understand how these mutations cause cancer, focusing on the regulation of chromatin structure dynamics (epigenomics) and chromatin remodeler protein complex assembly, as well as using genetic and chemical screens to identify potential therapeutic targets in human cancers. 


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