Circadian Biology (CIRB) Faculty

Jay C. Dunlap, Ph.D.

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Jay C. Dunlap

Nathan Smith Professor of Genetics, Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 702 Remsen

Phone: 603-646-5247

Work in the Dunlap lab is directed towards understanding circadian biology, the means by which biological clocks operate, are reset by the environment, and control the metabolism of cells. More recently a second effort has nucleated around high throughput functional genomics of filamentous fungi including Neurospora and Aspergillus spp.

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Jennifer J. Loros, Ph.D.

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Jennifer Loros

Professor of Biochemistry, and Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 704 Remsen

Phone: 603-646-5247

Our laboratories are interested in the genetic and molecular dissection of circadian systems in eukaryotic cells with a research emphasis on the fungus Neurospora and mammalian tissue culture. The circadian system comprises the core molecular feedback loop, how this loop feeds information to the cell and organism and how input to the loop via temperature changes and photoreceptors is regulated.


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C. Robertson McClung, Ph.D.

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C. Robertson McClung

Patricia F. / William B. Hale 1944 Professor in the Arts and Sciences, Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 323 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-3940


The ability of an organism to measure time is the product of a cellular biological clock. Many phenomena controlled by the biological clock cycle on a daily basis and are called circadian rhythms. My goal is to understand the genetic and biochemical mechanisms by which a plant measures time and uses that temporal information to regulate gene expression and cellular physiology.


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