Computational & Quantitative Biology (CQB) Faculty

Margaret E. Ackerman, Ph.D.

  • Associate Professor of Engineering, and Microbiology and Immunology
  • Thayer School of Engineering
  • Office: 119B Cummings Hall

  • Phone: 603-646-9922
  • The Ackerman laboratory conducts interdisciplinary research at the interface of biomedical and engineering sciences: developing high throughput tools to evaluate the antibody response in disease states ranging from infection to cancer in order to aid in therapeutic antibody and vaccine design and development, and to understand the protective mechanism of antibodies using approaches grounded in fundamental engineering principles utilizing protein evolution, molecular biology, and mathematical modeling.

Website | Email | PubMed Articles 1 & Articles 2 | Geisel Profile

Zi Chen, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Engineering, and Biological Sciences

Office: MacLean 302

Phone: 603-646-6475


Dr. Chen's research interests range from biomechanics and mechanobiology to solid mechanics and material science, covering such diverse topics as mechanics of morphogenesis in biological systems, cell biomechanics, fast motion of plants, mechanics of DNA structures, mechanical instabilities of materials, energy harvesting, stretchable electronics, biomimetic materials/devices, nanofabrication, and modeling of 2D materials.

Website | Email | PubMed Articles

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Gevorg Grigoryan, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Computer Science, and Biological Sciences

Office: Sudikoff 113

Phone: 603-646-3173


We are interested in understanding the design principles underlying natural protein function on a quantitative, structure-based level. We employ a mix of computational and experimental approaches to both understand functions of natural proteins and engineer proteins with novel functionality. 


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Allan Gulledge, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 601 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1222

Our research focus is the cerebral cortex, an area of the brain that serves as the biological substrate for the higher cognitive functions that define us as individuals. We wish to identify the mechanisms by which individual cortical neurons process and transmit information within the cortical circuit. To accomplish this we employ electrical and optical recording techniques that measure neuronal activity in neocortical neurons under a variety of experimental conditions.


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Bing He, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 350 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-2649 


I am interested in how complex tissue and organ structures arise from simple tissue primordia. Using an interdisciplinary approach combining genetics, cell biology, biophysics and mathematical modeling, we seek to understand how developmental patterning information controls individual cell shape changes and how they are integrated into stereotyped tissue-scale deformations.


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Jane Hill, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Engineering and Microbiology and Immunology

Office: MacLean 305 


Phone: 646-8656

Our research focuses on rapid, non-invasive detection and the tracking of infectious respiratory diseases using patient breath. Diseases we focus on range from acute pneumonias, such as those caused by influenza or bacterial agents like Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus, to chronic respiratory infections, such as those caused by Mycobacteria tuberculosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-dominant polymicrobial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We combine molecular biological, analytical chemistry, and 'big data' biostatistics tools when asking our metabolism-focused questions in the flask, animal model, or human patient. As such, our team consists of combinations of molecular biologists, microbiologist, chemists, engineers, medical doctors, and chemometricians.

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Anne G. Hoen, Ph.D., M.Phil.

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Biomedical Data Science, and Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 888 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-6087


Our work is on the development of the microbiome in infants and children, and the associations between environmental and dietary exposures, the microbiome, and risk for infectious diseases and other health outcomes.


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Deborah A. Hogan, Ph.D.

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 208 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1252


We study the mechanisms by which bacterial and fungal pathogens regulate virulence determinants within multicellular populations, within microbial communities and in the context of mammalian hosts.


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Steven D. Leach, M.D.

Director of Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Preston T. and Virginia R. Kelsey Distinguished Chair in Cancer

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: DH, Rubin Building, Room 801

Phone: 603-653-3611 


The Leach lab studies pancreatic developmental, epithelial and tumor biology, using mouse, zebrafish and human model sytems. 


Email | PubMed Articles

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Carey D. Nadell, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 326 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-1019


Bacteria often live in groups, called biofilms, where they cooperate and compete using a broad spectrum of interactive behaviors. These interactions are central to how bacteria evolve, and how they cause disease. We use molecular genetics, confocal microscopy, computational simulations, and evolutionary analysis to understand the mechanisms and biofilm-scale consequences of bacterial cell-cell interaction.


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Rahul Sarpeshkar, Ph.D.

Thomas E Kurtz Professor of Engineering

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Molecular and Systems Biology, and Physiology

Office: 507A Vail

Phone: 603-646-6821


Synthetic analog and digital biological circuits in electri-cigenic and other microbes; Applications of synthetic and systems biology to immunology, infectious disease, and cancer; Precision measurement, electronic circuit modeling, and feedback control of living cells at the fundamental limits set by physics.

Email | 

Geisel Profile

Daniel Schultz, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 206 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1644


The Schultz lab develops quantitative approaches to study the emergence, operation and optimization of the gene networks that control cell responses in bacteria, with a focus on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. We combine mathematical modeling, bioinformatics, experimental evolution and microfluidics to analyze how the cell controls the expression of resistance genes during drug responses. We strive to guide innovation in clinical therapies by uncovering the selective pressures that shape the evolution of antibiotic resistance in natural environments.

Website | Email | PubMed Articles

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Bruce Stanton, Ph.D.

Andrew C. Vail Memorial Professor

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, and of Physiology

Office: 615 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1775


Our laboratory studies the genetic disease Cystic Fibrosis. In particular we study host pathogen interactions between bacteria and human airway epithelial cells and the interactome of CFTR and how interacting proteins regulate CFTR trafficking. We also examine how environmental toxins, in particular arsenic, cause and contribute to respiratory and diseases and inflammation.


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Michael L. Whitfield, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Acting Director, Biomedical Date Science

Office: 705A Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1105 


The complexities of biological systems can now be studied with genome-wide approaches that take a global view of the underlaying biology. 


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Olga Zhaxybayeva, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 333 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-8616


My lab's research focus is to better understand evolution of microbes through computational analyses of genomic and metagenomic data.


Website | Email | PubMed Articles | Faculty Profile