Genomics & Proteomics (GENPRO) Faculty

James B. Bliska, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 524A Remsen

Phone: 
650-1674

My long-term research focus is to understand how bacterial toxins interact with the immune system to trigger pathogenesis or host protection. At Dartmouth, I will expand my research to investigate opportunistic bacterial pathogens that produce toxins and cause mucosal infections, such as those that occur in the lungs of Cystic Fibrosis patients. I will also be using synthetic immunology to develop novel therapeutics to combat opportunistic mucosal pathogens.

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Michael D. Cole, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

633 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-9975 


Our studies that focus on the genetic events involved in the induction of cancer provide an opportunity to define the molecular basis of the disease and to study the regulation and function of important eukaryotic genes that control cell proliferation.

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Robert A. Cramer, Ph.D.

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 213 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1040


Our research group investigates the molecular mechanisms through which the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus causes disease in diverse patient populations. We utilize molecular genetics, genomics, biochemistry, microscopy, immunology, and animal model approaches to develop, explore, and test our clinically relevant questions and hypotheses regarding these too often lethal infections.
 Our long-term goal is to translate results from these studies into novel therapeutic advances.

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Jay C. Dunlap, Ph.D.

Nathan Smith Professor of Genetics, Chair and Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 702 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1108


Work in the Dunlap lab is directed towards understanding circadian biology, the means by which biological clocks operate, are reset by the environment, and control the metabolism of cells. More recently a second effort has nucleated around high throughput functional genomics of filamentous fungi including Neurospora and Aspergillus spp.

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Scott A. Gerber, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 734 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-3679 


Research in the Gerber Lab is focused on developing and using modernproteomics methods to understand the mechanisms by which dysregulated mitotic kinases, such as Aurora kinase A, contribute to the onset and maintenance of cancers.

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Anne G. Hoen, Ph.D., M.Phil.

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Biomedical Data Science, and Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 888 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-6087


Our work is on the development of the microbiome in infants and children, and the associations between environmental and dietary exposures, the microbiome, and risk for infectious diseases and other health outcomes.


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Deborah A. Hogan, Ph.D.

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 208 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1252


We study the mechanisms by which bacterial and fungal pathogens regulate virulence determinants within multicellular populations, within microbial communities and in the context of mammalian hosts.


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Arminja N. Kettenbach, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 763 Rubin 
Phone: 603-653-9067 


Research in the lab focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which phosphatases contribute to phosphorylation-dependent signal transduction in mitosis. We use cell biological, biochemical, and proteomics approaches to decipher the connectivity and complexity of these signaling events in normal and cancer cells. 


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Jiwon Lee, Ph.D.

Ralph and Marjorie Crump Assistant Professor of Engineering

Thayer School of Engineering

Office:  751 Williamson Translational Research Building

Phone:  603-646-3485

The Lee Lab studies the dynamics of antibody repertoires in infectious disease, autoimmune disease, and cancer using high-throughput sequencing of B cell transcripts and high-resolution mass spectrometry. The repertoire of antibody molecules circulating in blood or coating mucosal surfaces is the basis for protective immunity, and we employ machine learning frameworks, big data analytics tools, proteomic analytical methods, and data modeling to gain clinically relevant insights regarding protective mechanisms at unprecedented details. Leveraging this knowledge, we aim to design next-generation therapeutics and vaccines precisely tailored to maximize effectiveness in the context of particular diseases and/or patients (i.e.personalized/precision medicine).

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Aaron McKenna, Ph.D.

Aaron McKenna, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office:  Williamson Translational Building, Room 658

Phone:  603-650-1866

My lab is interested in how cells grow and divide to form complex structures, such as the transformation from the zygote to an adult human or from a transformed cell into a tumor mass. To study these processes, we develop technologies to trace pattern of cell divisions which recovers the lineage of each cell. This information can be combined with other measures of cell state such as single-cell transcriptomic data to develop a rich picture of how choices are made in development and how this process is dysregulated in diseases such as cancer.

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Benjamin D. Ross, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office:  504A Vail Building

Phone:

The bacteria resident in the human gastrointestinal tract (the gut microbiota) potently influence diverse aspects of human health, including immunity. However, the forces that govern the composition of the gut microbiota are poorly understood. Our work focuses on a mechanistic, ecological, and evolutionary understanding of how interbacterial interactions between members of the dominant Gram-negative bacteria in the gut, the Bacteroidales, modulate the composition of the microbiota. The Bacteroidales utilize a contact-dependent toxin-delivery system known as the type VI secretion system (T6SS) to kill neighboring cells. We study the impact of this pathway on the microbiota and how bacteria adapt to defend against T6SS-mediated antagonism, using a combination of bacterial genetics, biochemistry, metagenomics, and germ-free mouse models. We are also interested in understanding why Bacteroidales abundance is depleted in individuals with cystic fibrosis, with the goal of improving health through restoration of these bacteria.

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Daniel Schultz, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 206 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1644


The Schultz lab develops quantitative approaches to study the emergence, operation and optimization of the gene networks that control cell responses in bacteria, with a focus on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. We combine mathematical modeling, bioinformatics, experimental evolution and microfluidics to analyze how the cell controls the expression of resistance genes during drug responses. We strive to guide innovation in clinical therapies by uncovering the selective pressures that shape the evolution of antibiotic resistance in natural environments.

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Michael L. Whitfield, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Acting Director, Biomedical Data Science

Office: 705A Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1105 


The complexities of biological systems can now be studied with genome-wide approaches that take a global view of the underlaying biology. 


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Olga Zhaxybayeva, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 333 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-8616


My lab's research focus is to better understand evolution of microbes through computational analyses of genomic and metagenomic data.


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