Genomics & Proteomics (GENPRO) Faculty

Yashi Ahmed, M.D., Ph.D.

 

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 613 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1027


The evolutionarily conserved Wnt signal transduction pathway directs cell proliferation and differentiation during animal development and tissue homeostasis. Despite the fact that deregulation of Wnt signaling underlies numerous developmental disorders and cancers, including nearly all colorectal cancers, many of these mechanisms remain poorly understood. The long-term goal of research in the Ahmed Lab is to elucidate the mechanisms that activate Wnt signaling during animal development using a Drosophila model and to use this knowledge to identify control points in the pathway susceptible to therapeutic targeting in Wnt-driven diseases.

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AMANDA A. AMODEO, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office:  223 Life Sciences Center

Phone:  603-646-9926

My lab seeks to uncover how cell size, zygotic genome activation, chromatin regulation, and the cell cycle come together to regulate early development in the Drosophila embryo. We use a combination of quantitative imaging, cell biology, genetics, genomics, biochemistry, and mathematical modeling to answer questions about how cells sense fundamental biological properties such as their size and developmental stage.

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James B. Bliska, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 524A Remsen

Phone: 
650-1674

My long-term research focus is to understand how bacterial toxins interact with the immune system to trigger pathogenesis or host protection. At Dartmouth, I will expand my research to investigate opportunistic bacterial pathogens that produce toxins and cause mucosal infections, such as those that occur in the lungs of Cystic Fibrosis patients. I will also be using synthetic immunology to develop novel therapeutics to combat opportunistic mucosal pathogens.

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Giovanni Bosco, Ph.D.

Oscar M. Cohn Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 609A Vail

Phone: 650-1210

We are interested in understanding how nuclear architecture, chromosome morphology and chromatin structure are modified in response to developmental cues and environmental factors. We are also interested in elucidating the molecular mechanisms through which these modifications function and effect specialized cellular processes.


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Michael D. Cole, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

633 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-9975 


Our studies that focus on the genetic events involved in the induction of cancer provide an opportunity to define the molecular basis of the disease and to study the regulation and function of important eukaryotic genes that control cell proliferation.

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Robert A. Cramer, Ph.D.

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 213 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1040


Our research group investigates the molecular mechanisms through which the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus causes disease in diverse patient populations. We utilize molecular genetics, genomics, biochemistry, microscopy, immunology, and animal model approaches to develop, explore, and test our clinically relevant questions and hypotheses regarding these too often lethal infections.
 Our long-term goal is to translate results from these studies into novel therapeutic advances.

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Patrick J. Dolph, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 351 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-1092


Our laboratory utilizes Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study retinal degeneration and molecular mechanisms of cell death.


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Jay C. Dunlap, Ph.D.

Nathan Smith Professor of Genetics, Chair and Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 702 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1108


Work in the Dunlap lab is directed towards understanding circadian biology, the means by which biological clocks operate, are reset by the environment, and control the metabolism of cells. More recently a second effort has nucleated around high throughput functional genomics of filamentous fungi including Neurospora and Aspergillus spp.

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Scott A. Gerber, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 734 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-3679 


Research in the Gerber Lab is focused on developing and using modernproteomics methods to understand the mechanisms by which dysregulated mitotic kinases, such as Aurora kinase A, contribute to the onset and maintenance of cancers.

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Erik E. Griffin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 348 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-8269


We are interested in understanding how protein concentration gradients are generated in the cytoplasm and contribute to cell fate specification during development. We combine live imaging, biochemical and genetic approaches to study a series of cytoplasmic protein gradients that help pattern the early C. elegans embryo. 


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Mary Lou Guerinot, Ph.D.

Ronald and Deborah Harris Professor in the Sciences, Professor of Biological Sciences, and Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 325 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-2527


My principal expertise and research interests are in the area of metal transport and regulation of gene expression by metals. Plants are the major point of entry for essential metals into the food chain, so our work is laying the foundation for crops that offer sustainable solutions for malnutrition.


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Allan Gulledge, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 601 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1222

Our research focus is the cerebral cortex, an area of the brain that serves as the biological substrate for the higher cognitive functions that define us as individuals. We wish to identify the mechanisms by which individual cortical neurons process and transmit information within the cortical circuit. To accomplish this we employ electrical and optical recording techniques that measure neuronal activity in neocortical neurons under a variety of experimental conditions.


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Bing He, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 350 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-2649 


I am interested in how complex tissue and organ structures arise from simple tissue primordia. Using an interdisciplinary approach combining genetics, cell biology, biophysics and mathematical modeling, we seek to understand how developmental patterning information controls individual cell shape changes and how they are integrated into stereotyped tissue-scale deformations.


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Anne G. Hoen, Ph.D., M.Phil.

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Biomedical Data Science, and Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 888 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-6087


Our work is on the development of the microbiome in infants and children, and the associations between environmental and dietary exposures, the microbiome, and risk for infectious diseases and other health outcomes.


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Deborah A. Hogan, Ph.D.

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 208 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1252


We study the mechanisms by which bacterial and fungal pathogens regulate virulence determinants within multicellular populations, within microbial communities and in the context of mammalian hosts.


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Arminja N. Kettenbach, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 763 Rubin 
Phone: 603-653-9067 


Research in the lab focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which phosphatases contribute to phosphorylation-dependent signal transduction in mitosis. We use cell biological, biochemical, and proteomics approaches to decipher the connectivity and complexity of these signaling events in normal and cancer cells. 


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C. Robertson McClung, Ph.D.

Patricia F. / William B. Hale 1944 Professor in the Arts and Sciences, Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 323 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-3940


The ability of an organism to measure time is the product of a cellular biological clock. Many phenomena controlled by the biological clock cycle on a daily basis and are called circadian rhythms. My goal is to understand the genetic and biochemical mechanisms by which a plant measures time and uses that temporal information to regulate gene expression and cellular physiology.


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Aaron McKenna, Ph.D.

Aaron McKenna, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office:  Williamson Translational Building, Room 658

Phone:  603-650-1866

My lab is interested in how cells grow and divide to form complex structures, such as the transformation from the zygote to an adult human or from a transformed cell into a tumor mass. To study these processes, we develop technologies to trace pattern of cell divisions which recovers the lineage of each cell. This information can be combined with other measures of cell state such as single-cell transcriptomic data to develop a rich picture of how choices are made in development and how this process is dysregulated in diseases such as cancer.

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James B. Moseley, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 412 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1159

Many cell types delay cell cycle transitions until they reach a critical size threshold. We are studying the cellular mechanisms that measure size, and their role in coordinating cell growth and division.

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Larry C. Myers, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Medical Education, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: Vail 412

Phone: 603-650-1198

The goal of our lab is to determine how genetic and epigenetic information in eukaryotic cells is used to regulate the transcription of genes. We are particularly interested in how human fungal pathogens utilize epigenetic regulatory strategies to switch phenotypes and facilitate virulence.

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Carey D. Nadell, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 326 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-1019


Bacteria often live in groups, called biofilms, where they cooperate and compete using a broad spectrum of interactive behaviors. These interactions are central to how bacteria evolve, and how they cause disease. We use molecular genetics, confocal microscopy, computational simulations, and evolutionary analysis to understand the mechanisms and biofilm-scale consequences of bacterial cell-cell interaction.


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Diwakar Pattabiraman Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, and Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Office: Rubin 602

Phone: 603-653-9957 


Our research focuses on understanding the genetic, epigenetic, signaling and cell biological aspects of tumor progression and metastasis in carcinomas. We study the role of transitions in epithelial and mesenchymal states within carcinomas as a model of understanding intratumoral heterogeneity to develop novel ways of overcoming metastatic progression and therapy resistance.


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Benjamin D. Ross, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office:  504A Vail Building

Phone:

The bacteria resident in the human gastrointestinal tract (the gut microbiota) potently influence diverse aspects of human health, including immunity. However, the forces that govern the composition of the gut microbiota are poorly understood. Our work focuses on a mechanistic, ecological, and evolutionary understanding of how interbacterial interactions between members of the dominant Gram-negative bacteria in the gut, the Bacteroidales, modulate the composition of the microbiota. The Bacteroidales utilize a contact-dependent toxin-delivery system known as the type VI secretion system (T6SS) to kill neighboring cells. We study the impact of this pathway on the microbiota and how bacteria adapt to defend against T6SS-mediated antagonism, using a combination of bacterial genetics, biochemistry, metagenomics, and germ-free mouse models. We are also interested in understanding why Bacteroidales abundance is depleted in individuals with cystic fibrosis, with the goal of improving health through restoration of these bacteria.

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Yolanda Sanchez, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Associate Director for Basic Sciences, Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Office:  Vail 501

Phone:  603-650-1669

Checkpoint signaling events triggered during the response to DNA damage or replication interference, how they regulate cell cycle progression, DNA repair and cell death.  The role of checkpoints in the etiology of cancer and as drug targets for therapeutic enhancers of genotoxic cancer drugs.

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Daniel Schultz, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 206 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1644


The Schultz lab develops quantitative approaches to study the emergence, operation and optimization of the gene networks that control cell responses in bacteria, with a focus on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. We combine mathematical modeling, bioinformatics, experimental evolution and microfluidics to analyze how the cell controls the expression of resistance genes during drug responses. We strive to guide innovation in clinical therapies by uncovering the selective pressures that shape the evolution of antibiotic resistance in natural environments.

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Bruce Stanton, Ph.D.

Andrew C. Vail Memorial Professor

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, and of Physiology

Office: 615 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1775


Our laboratory studies the genetic disease Cystic Fibrosis. In particular we study host pathogen interactions between bacteria and human airway epithelial cells and the interactome of CFTR and how interacting proteins regulate CFTR trafficking. We also examine how environmental toxins, in particular arsenic, cause and contribute to respiratory and diseases and inflammation.


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Surachai Supattapone, M.D., Ph.D., D.Phil.

Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, and Medicine

Office: 311 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1192

Our lab investigates the molecular mechanisms responsible for the propagation of protein misfolding in neurodegenerative diseases, with special focus on infectious mammalian prions.  We also use whole genome CRISPR libraries to study various areas of cell biology in mammalian cells.

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Xiaofeng Wang, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 632 Rubin

Phone:  603-653-9974


Our work focuses on cancer epigenetics. We are particularly interested in studying a family of chromatin remodeling complexes, which are frequently mutated in a variety of human cancers. Our work is aimed to understand how these mutations cause cancer, focusing on the regulation of chromatin structure dynamics (epigenomics) and chromatin remodeler protein complex assembly, as well as using genetic and chemical screens to identify potential therapeutic targets in human cancers. 


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Michael L. Whitfield, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Acting Director, Biomedical Data Science

Office: 705A Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1105 


The complexities of biological systems can now be studied with genome-wide approaches that take a global view of the underlaying biology. 


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Olga Zhaxybayeva, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 333 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-8616


My lab's research focus is to better understand evolution of microbes through computational analyses of genomic and metagenomic data.


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