Genomics & Proteomics (GENPRO) Faculty

James B. Bliska, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 602W Borwell

Phone: 
650-1168

My long-term research focus is to understand how bacterial toxins interact with the immune system to trigger pathogenesis or host protection. At Dartmouth, I will expand my research to investigate opportunistic bacterial pathogens that produce toxins and cause mucosal infections, such as those that occur in the lungs of Cystic Fibrosis patients. I will also be using synthetic immunology to develop novel therapeutics to combat opportunistic mucosal pathogens.

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Michael D. Cole, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

633 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-9975 


Our studies that focus on the genetic events involved in the induction of cancer provide an opportunity to define the molecular basis of the disease and to study the regulation and function of important eukaryotic genes that control cell proliferation.

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Robert A. Cramer, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 213 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1040


Our research group investigates the mechanisms by which the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigates causes disease in immunocompromised patients. The main focus of our current studies is to understand the molecular mechanisms that Aspergillus and other human pathogenic fungi use to adapt to low oxygen microenvironments (hypoxia) that are found in vivo at sites of infection. In addition, we are exploring how hypoxia affects the innate immune response in patients at risk for invasive aspergillosis. We utilize molecular biology, genomics, biochemistry, microscopy, immunology, and animal model approaches to develop and explore our clinically relevant questions regarding these often lethal infections.


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Jay C. Dunlap, Ph.D.

Nathan Smith Professor of Genetics, Chair and Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 702 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1108


Work in the Dunlap lab is directed towards understanding circadian biology, the means by which biological clocks operate, are reset by the environment, and control the metabolism of cells. More recently a second effort has nucleated around high throughput functional genomics of filamentous fungi including Neurospora and Aspergillus spp.

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Scott A. Gerber, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 734 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-3679 


Research in the Gerber Lab is focused on developing and using modernproteomics methods to understand the mechanisms by which dysregulated mitotic kinases, such as Aurora kinase A, contribute to the onset and maintenance of cancers.

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Anne G. Hoen, Ph.D., M.Phil.

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Biomedical Data Science, and Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 888 Rubin

Phone: 603-653-6087


Our work is on the development of the microbiome in infants and children, and the associations between environmental and dietary exposures, the microbiome, and risk for infectious diseases and other health outcomes.


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Deborah A. Hogan, Ph.D.

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 208 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1252


We study the mechanisms by which bacterial and fungal pathogens regulate virulence determinants within multicellular populations, within microbial communities and in the context of mammalian hosts.


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Arminja N. Kettenbach, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 763 Rubin 
Phone: 603-653-9067 


Research in the lab focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which phosphatases contribute to phosphorylation-dependent signal transduction in mitosis. We use cell biological, biochemical, and proteomics approaches to decipher the connectivity and complexity of these signaling events in normal and cancer cells. 


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Daniel Schultz, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: 206 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1644


The Schultz lab develops quantitative approaches to study the emergence, operation and optimization of the gene networks that control cell responses in bacteria, with a focus on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. We combine mathematical modeling, bioinformatics, experimental evolution and microfluidics to analyze how the cell controls the expression of resistance genes during drug responses. We strive to guide innovation in clinical therapies by uncovering the selective pressures that shape the evolution of antibiotic resistance in natural environments.

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Michael L. Whitfield, Ph.D.

Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Acting Director, Biomedical Date Science

Office: 705A Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1105 


The complexities of biological systems can now be studied with genome-wide approaches that take a global view of the underlaying biology. 


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Olga Zhaxybayeva, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 333 Life Sciences Center

Phone: 603-646-8616


My lab's research focus is to better understand evolution of microbes through computational analyses of genomic and metagenomic data.


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