Neuroscience (NEUR) Faculty

Giovanni Bosco, Ph.D.

Oscar M. Cohn Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, Chair of MCB Program

Office: 609A Vail

Phone: 650-1210

We are interested in understanding how nuclear architecture, chromosome morphology and chromatin structure are modified in response to developmental cues and environmental factors. We are also interested in elucidating the molecular mechanisms through which these modifications function and effect specialized cellular processes.


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T.Y. Chang, Ph.D.

Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 304 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1622


The enzyme acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) is a membrane bound protein located at the endoplasmic reticulum. It plays important roles in health and in diseases. Our laboratory identified the ACAT1 gene. We are conducting structure-function analysis of ACAT1 in vitro, and taking mouse genetic approaches to determine the pathophysiological role of ACAT1 in Alzheimer's disease, in atherosclerosis, and in diet-induced obesity.

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Zi Chen, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Engineering, and Biological Sciences

Office: MacLean 302

Phone: 603-646-6475


Dr. Chen's research interests range from biomechanics and mechanobiology to solid mechanics and material science, covering such diverse topics as mechanics of morphogenesis in biological systems, cell biomechanics, fast motion of plants, mechanics of DNA structures, mechanical instabilities of materials, energy harvesting, stretchable electronics, biomimetic materials/devices, nanofabrication, and modeling of 2D materials.

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Allan Gulledge, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 601 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1222

Our research focus is the cerebral cortex, an area of the brain that serves as the biological substrate for the higher cognitive functions that define us as individuals. We wish to identify the mechanisms by which individual cortical neurons process and transmit information within the cortical circuit. To accomplish this we employ electrical and optical recording techniques that measure neuronal activity in neocortical neurons under a variety of experimental conditions.


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Robert A. Hill Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 344 Life Sciences Center

Phone:

We study the multicellular interactions between neurons and glia in the brain with a primary focus on the development,plasticity, and regeneration of myelinating oligodendrocytes. Techniques include high-resolution optical imaging in combination with molecular labels, genetic manipulation, and sensors of cellular physiology.


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Michael B. Hoppa, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Office: 345 Life Sciences

Phone: 603-646-8850


We explore the molecular mechanisms that control ion channel localization, expression and function in primary neurons using quantitative optical approaches in combination with genetic and biochemical tools. 


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Bryan W. Luikart, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology

Office: 604 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1633


We are interested in how gene mutations that cause autism alter neuronal development and function. To study this we engineer viruses to perform in vivo genetic manipulations and employ electrophysiology and multi-photon microscopy to study the impact of genetic manipulations on neuronal function. 


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Robert A. Maue, Ph.D.

Professor of Medical Education, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Office: 210 Remsen

Phone: 603-650-1726

We are interested in understanding the mechanisms important for the development and differentiation of neurons in the brain. 


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Surachai Supattapone, M.D., Ph.D., D.Phil.


Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, and Medicine

Office: 311 Vail

Phone: 603-650-1192

Our lab investigates the molecular mechanisms responsible for the propagation of protein misfolding in neurodegenerative diseases such as prion and Alzheimer's disease.

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Hermes H. Yeh, Ph.D.

  • William W. Brown 1835 Memorial Professor
  • Professor of Molecular and Systems Biology, and Neurobiology
  • Director, Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine
  • Office: 625 Remsen
  • Phone: 603-650-1698
  • Cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuroreceptor interactions and plasticity in the adult and developing CNS.

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